Async Methods II: object safety

Last time, we introduced the idea of async methods, and talked about how they would be implemented: as a kind of anonymous associated type on the trait that declares the method, which corresponds to a different, anonymous future type for each implementation of that method. Starting this week we’re going to look at some of the implications of that. The first one we’re going to look at is object safety. [Read More]

Async Methods I: generic associated types

Async/await continues to move along swimmingly. We’ve accepted an RFC describing how the async/await syntax will work in Rust, and work is underway on implementing support for it in the compiler. We’re hopeful that users will be able to start experimenting with the syntax on nightly by early July. The RFC for async/await didn’t address one important thing: async methods. It is very important for people defining libraries to be able to define traits that contain async functions, like this: [Read More]

Unsafe Abstractions

Unsafety in Rust is often discussed in terms the primitive operations that can only be performed inside of unsafe blocks (such as dereferencing raw pointers and accessing mutable statics). I want to look at it from a different angle from these primitive operations, and instead focus on the capability to produce unsafe abstractions. The general concept of unsafe abstractions An unsafe abstraction is a new abstraction which requires the unsafe keyword to apply to some context (this is an intentionally “abstract” definition, because as we will see there are several highly divergent forms of unsafe abstraction supported in Rust). [Read More]

Handshake Patterns

The problem: defining a ‘handshake’ protocol between two traits You have a problem that decomposes in this way: you want any type which implements trait Alpha to be composable with any type which implements trait Omega… That is, if Foo and Bar are both Alphas and Baz and Quux are both Omegas, you can compose Foo with Baz or Quux, and the same with Bar, and so on. This is not a trivial problem. [Read More]